How music works david byrne pdf

 

    How music works, or doesn't work, is determined not just by what it is in isolation Courtesy of David Byrne These poor souls thrust in the limelight had to pdf. Outsider: John Rockwell on the Arts, –, , Limelight Editions, p. HOW MUSIC WORKS BY DAVID BYRNE. Chapter 7 of this book entitled “ Business and Finances (distribution and survival options for music artists)” is. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. How Music Works is David Byrne's remarkable and buoyant celebration of a subject he has spent a lifetime thinking about.

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    How Music Works David Byrne Pdf

    [David Byrne] -- The Rock-and-Roll Hall of Fame inductee and co-founder of Talking Heads presents a celebration of music that offers insight into the roles of time, place and recording technology, discussing how OverDrive (PDF) · Image. David Byrne's new book, “How Music Works,” is not so bad as that. But I'm fairly certain its tedium stunned some of the cluster flies on my office. [PDF] Download How Music Works Ebook | READ ONLINE How Music Works is David Book Details Author: David Byrne Pages:

    Look Inside. May 02, Pages download. May 02, Pages. Utilizing his incomparable career and inspired collaborations with Talking Heads, Brian Eno, and many others, Byrne taps deeply into his lifetime of knowledge to explore the panoptic elements of music, how it shapes the human experience, and reveals the impetus behind how we create, consume, distribute, and enjoy the songs, symphonies, and rhythms that provide the backbeat of life. A cofounder of the musical group Talking Heads, David Byrne has also released several solo albums in addition to collaborating with such noted artists as Twyla Tharp, Robert Wilson, and Brian Eno. His art includes photography and installation works and… More about David Byrne. Music Category:

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    Embeds 0 No embeds. No notes for slide. How Music Works to download this book the link is on the last page 2. Utilizing his incomparable career and inspired collaborations with Talking Heads, Brian Eno, and many others, Byrne taps deeply into his lifetime of knowledge to explore the panoptic elements of music, how it shapes the human experience, and reveals the impetus behind how we create, consume, distribute, and enjoy the songs, symphonies, and rhythms that provide the backbeat of life.

    Book Details Author: David Byrne Pages: Paperback Brand: Book Appearances 5.

    How Music Works

    You just clipped your first slide! Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    But then, this is very much the sort of tour where our guide will mention, out of the blue: "Penelope Gouk of the University of Manchester wrote a wonderful essay called 'Raising Spirits and Restoring Souls: Early Modern Medical Explanations for Music's Effects'.

    It should not be forgotten that he was largely responsible for two of the greatest albums ever made — Remain in Light and My Life in the Bush of Ghosts , the latter of which gets plentiful coverage here. But past is past.

    How Music Works by David Byrne - review | Books | The Guardian

    Everyone knows that the music industry is in terminal decline. Unlike many doomsayers, however, Byrne feels the changed landscape is good for musicians. Even 20 years ago, any artist wishing to make a record needed a huge sum of money to pay for studio time and thus needed a large corporation to loan it to him.

    A lucky few shifted the millions of units necessary to repay the industry's investment, but the majority got hopelessly into debt. Nowadays, recording costs are "approaching zero". Distribution costs in the digital era are also negligible compared to the days of physical warehousing. As long as artists can find ways of holding on to a fair percentage of their income an impossible challenge in the heyday of the record companies , even modest sales can sustain a career.

    It was a little hard to read, from Byrne's perspective, about how well funded classical music is, while dealing bitterly with my own orchestra's financial crisis; and it was disheartening to learn that one of my musical heroes doesn't particularly care for Bach, Mozart, or Beethoven.

    But what the book lacks, in places, in depth and substance, it partly makes up for in Byrne's beguiling sincerity—the same quality that, for me, renders his music there too, even when flawed irresistible. Which reinforces my ultimate conclusion about this book: That—plus the conviction that it was certainly a better read than "The Baseball Codes"—saves this book from a 2-star rating.

    Apr 10, julieta rated it it was amazing Shelves: Una maravilla de libro. Este es David con todo, y eso que no puedo decir que he seguido su carrera, aunque siempre he admirado su capacidad para hacer tantas cosas distintas, arte, performance, talking heads! Me deja muy inspirada para salirme de la caja, para inventar, intentar, y seguir haciendo m Una maravilla de libro. Muy recomendado. Nov 14, Charles rated it it was amazing.

    I have been a Talking Heads listener for 30 years. For some reason that escapes me now I began to read How Music Works. To my delight I found it compelling. While much of the text is almost a autobiographical narrative of the creating of Byrne's musical corpus, the role of that narrative is quite different than one might expect.

    I take the book to be a discussion, a philosophical discussion in the best sense, of the creative process. I am reminded of Wittgenstein's metaphor of coming to understan I have been a Talking Heads listener for 30 years.

    I am reminded of Wittgenstein's metaphor of coming to understand a concept by a detailed exploration of its neighborhood, approaching from every direction.

    Byrne builds a case against the picture of the creative process as a kind of spasm of a tortured soul. While there are likely examples of that genesis of creativity, Byrne instead examines how all the different, divergent factors that impinge on music serve to constrain, enable, and shape the creation that flows from the artist's interests and desires, including extended discussions of venue, the activity of performance, the evolving economics of the music industry, transformative technology, the social scene, collaboration.

    The discussion is concrete, grounded in his personal narrative but also abstracted from it, distilled. I might add that it is fascinating to watch Stop Making Sense in conjunction with the book's tale. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the creative process, from music to poetry to painting. It is a wise book. Jul 30, Tomas Ramanauskas rated it it was amazing Shelves: David Byrne, a legend, becomes your professor for duration of this book and delivers a fascinating deep dive into the world of music, its hows and whys.

    He scatters autobiographical experiences amid broadly scoped lecture on the sounds, the formats, the shapes, the evolution, even the numbers behind the recordings. It is a multi-faceted account of near child like astonishment on how this bloody thing really works. Jan 31, Chris rated it it was ok Shelves: This book fails to live up to its title, and indeed to the name of its author, who's musical career might lead you to expect that he has some interesting insight into the question of how music works.

    What you get instead is a cursory and unfocused ramble through recent history of music technology and theory, loosely tied together with some personal anecdotes and sophomoric pseudo-philosophy courtesy of Byrne himself. There are some interesting tidbits along the way, particularly some of the histo This book fails to live up to its title, and indeed to the name of its author, who's musical career might lead you to expect that he has some interesting insight into the question of how music works.

    There are some interesting tidbits along the way, particularly some of the history of music technology, and he pays lip service to interesting theorists and musicians and movements. If you went through the book with a highlighter, you'd come up with a list of fascinating topics to read about.

    Unfortunately, Byrne usually goes into less depth than your typical Wikipedia introductory paragraph -- Kant's treatise on the nature of beauty is both introduced and dismissed outright in a single sentence -- and one is left with the sense that he hasn't actually done much research at all. This might be forgivable if Byrne had some great insights to offer, but instead he comes off as simply naive.

    Quite strangely, he includes a rant against classical music, which evolves into a rant against the rich and the "elitists" who support the arts.

    Indeed throughout the book he champions the idea of amateurism over professionalism which might explain his approach to writing the book itself. It should perhaps not be a surprise, then, when his final chapter veers squarely into teenager-who-just-smoked-pot-for-the-first-time territory: What if music makes us?

    Toe-tappers, finger-snappers, whistlers and hummers. Recommended to Alan by: Denis, via Peter. And of course the man himself. David Byrne 's How Music Works was a perfect book for me to take traveling—dense with information, observations and concrete advice, all organized in manageable sections and copioiusly illustrated.

    Byrne delivers most handsomely on his title's promise: Byrne is also and not coincidentally, I'm sure a lifelong neophile, whose mind has remained supple over the pa David Byrne 's How Music Works was a perfect book for me to take traveling—dense with information, observations and concrete advice, all organized in manageable sections and copioiusly illustrated.

    Byrne is also and not coincidentally, I'm sure a lifelong neophile, whose mind has remained supple over the passage of decades. There are no hard and fast rules as far as I'm concerned. I learned a lot from How Music Works , in fact.

    The unlikely history of audio tape recording, for just one example, a story I'd never seen elsewhere that involves both strangely-timed Nazi radio transmissions and Bing Crosby's passion for golf With the Microsoft presentation software PowerPoint, for example, you have to simplify your presentations so much that subtle nuances in the subject being discussed often get edited out.

    These nuances are not forbidden, they're not blocked, but including them tends to make for a less successful presentation.

    Likewise, that which is easy to bullet-point and simply visualize works better. That doesn't mean it actually is better; it means working in certain ways is simply easier than working in others. Music software is no different. The mixtapes we made for ourselves were musical mirrors. The sadness, anger, or frustration you might be feeling at a given time could be encapsulated in the song selection.

    You made mixtapes that corresponded to emotional states, and they'd be available to pop into the deck when each feeling needed reinforcing or soothing. The mixtape was your friend, your psychiatrist, and your solace.

    I chatted with Cory Doctorow , an author and activist who prioritizes Internet freedom over the rights of musicians and artists, sometimes to their financial detriment. I remember coming up with the words for the song " Nothing but Flowers" while driving around suburban Minneapolis.

    Byrne uses the word "provenance" several times shades of Ann Leckie and her eponymous novel, which I just read, which is probably why this stood out for me —and he doesn't always use it correctly. Aside from that, though Byrne was a major instigator and one of dozens of co-signers on a full-page ad reproduced on p.

    But then it's difficult if not impossible to be a creative person in the U. And, unlike religion, no one has ever gone to war over music. Byrne does provide some biographical material—a couple of mentions of his daughter, for example, though not her name or her mother's name—but the focus here is on his professional life, as a musician who has remained relevant, both in and out of Talking Heads, for more than forty years.

    After all, Music isn't fragile. View all 3 comments. Jun 02, Cheryl rated it really liked it. Even though I know nothing about music, not even to know the difference between a chord and a chorus, nor have I been able to either enjoy or appreciate Talking Heads or Byrne's other music, I thoroughly enjoyed most of this book. I do admit to feeling overwhelmed enough, or lost enough, to skim bits, but something on the next page would always draw me back in Most interesting stuff needs context and so is too long to share here, but I've got a few tidbits to offer: And that common language eventually enabled the unity that led to the ouster of the British Empire.

    Where Art Comes from and Why: Music-making imparts lessons that reach well beyond songwriting and jamming. The what of the national throat? Will it not weaken? What of the national chest? Will it not shrink? This is great. All of the above.

    It seemed to come at music from all sides: What scope! For a musician, it seemed something like a map through the labyrinth. Sep 29, Pustulio rated it really liked it. La estrella que le falta es culpa del editor. Y me parece que pudiera tener un mejor orden si el editor hubiera hecho su trabajo.

    Dicho esto: Te guste o no Byrne el libro esta muy interesante. Y ahora un gif de Byrne bailando View 2 comments. Sep 08, Neal rated it it was amazing. My review for site's Best Books of the Month: It's no surprise that David Byrne knows his music. As the creative force behind Talking Heads and many solo and collaborative ventures, he's been writing, playing, and recording music for decades.

    What is surprising is how well his voice translates to the page.

    Other books: DAVID ICKE EBOOK

    In this wide-ranging, occasionally autobiographical analysis of the evolution and inner workings of the music industry, Byrne explores his own deep curiosity about the "patterns in how music My review for site's Best Books of the Month: In this wide-ranging, occasionally autobiographical analysis of the evolution and inner workings of the music industry, Byrne explores his own deep curiosity about the "patterns in how music is written, recorded, distributed, and received.

    David Byrne kommer rundt om de fleste processer og kontekster for det han elsker: Mar 15, Erik rated it liked it. Three stars because i liked it. Its more of a 3. This book is a classic case of the whole being less than the sum of its parts. Part autobiography, part pop-sci book on music, part New Yorker-style expose on the nature of the arts.

    You get bits of all of it, but you cant help feeling that you are missing out on a lot. Maybe thats the point - a jumping off point? Except you don't really know what you are missing. For a book that is about "how music wor Three stars because i liked it. For a book that is about "how music works" , he focuses less on the method and more on the impacts of music. I was hoping for much more detail about teh origin and history of different parts of music - beats, vocals, grooves, melodies, chords - from an international perspective.

    You get a little bit of that, but its just a taste. That can be frustrating. Perhaps if this book was named "David Byrne's book about of a bunch of musically related stuff" i would be complaining less. I dont feel this book is edited well at all. It all feels very disjointed. The last bits of the book thematically belong with the first bits.

    Im sure the editors did there best - probably not enough raw material for as wide of a scope envisioned. As a big Talking Heads fan, i enjoyed getting to know David through the conversational tone presented as well as the myriad anecdotes. He contradicts Jonathem Lethem multiple times in discussing Fear of Music - i enjoyed that.

    As a New Yorker, i enjoyed the local references and vivid depictions of bygone crime-ridden manahttan. I would have enjoyed a full on autobiography probably a lot more than this book though. I liked it - 3 stars.

    Will look for in-depth books on musical construction elsewhere. Sep 12, Christopher rated it it was amazing.

    As much as I am a fan of Talking Heads and David Byrne, when he wrote a book about bicycling a couple of years ago, I picked it up but I didn't get very far. Not a big fan of bicycles.

    How Music Works

    But I am a big fan of music. This should be required reading for anyone who has even a sliver of desire for making music for a living.

    You don't need to be a fan of Byrne's music to appreciate the fruits of his experience, talent and insight. This is a As much as I am a fan of Talking Heads and David Byrne, when he wrote a book about bicycling a couple of years ago, I picked it up but I didn't get very far. This is a man who knows what he's talking about with music, and he wants you to understand all that he's learned.

    Even readers whose passion for music begins and ends at the record store will learn tons from Byrne's music history lessons and his recollections from decades of studio recording and touring. At times his book flirts with autobiography, yet falls short of telling juicy tales out of class. Byrne's writing is personable yet at all times scholarly. But not stuffy. This is the hip old music professor who you wished you could have a beer with after class. Byrne's writing style is witty and glib throughout, which is especially useful as he trods through some of the drier territories of music theory and the economics of the record industry.

    He is great at keeping the reader awake and engaged through some pretty heady stuff.

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